All About Project Management Education and Certification

While you will always find those who make an argument that experience matters more than education, successful project managers should build a personal portfolio that includes both formal academic education as well as certifications geared to the type of project management methodology they typically practice slot joker online. While a degree is not necessarily required to become an IT project manager, you’ll find few employers willing to hire individuals without one.

By way of example, we conducted an informal job search of several popular job boards and reviewed real-world requirements of prospective employers. In addition to experience, all required some type of certification. Except for a single post, all employers required at least a bachelor-level degree in computer science, information management systems, information technology or some similar field.

In addition to technical degrees and project management certifications, academic degrees in project management are increasing in popularity. Those interested in pursuing a degree in project management will find numerous programs available. Examples of a few of the degreed project management programs we found included Colorado Technical University’s Bachelor of Science in Business Administration: Project Management (BSBA-PM), Ashford University’s Bachelor of Arts in Project Management, while Colorado State University’s Global Campus offers a Bachelor of Project Management degree.

What does a Bookkeeper do?

Bookkeeping, in the traditional sense, has been around as long as there has been commerce – since around 2600 B.C. A bookkeeper’s job is to maintain complete records of all money that has come in and gone out of the business Situs Nonton Movie Sub Indo. Bookkeepers record daily transactions in a consistent, easy-to-read way, and their records enable the accountants to do their jobs.

These are some typical bookkeeping tasks:

  • Recording financial transactions
  • Posting debits and credits
  • Producing invoices
  • Managing payroll

Maintaining and balancing ledgers, accounts, and subsidiaries
One of the main duties of a bookkeeper is maintaining a general ledger, which is a document that records the amounts from sale and expense receipts. Ledgers can vary in complexity from a sheet of paper to specialized bookkeeping software, such as QuickBooks and Xero, to track their entries, debits, and credits. [Looking for accounting software? Check out our best picks.]

Each sale and purchase made by your business must be recorded in the ledger, and some items will need documentation. You can find more information on which transactions require supporting documents on the IRS website.

There are not any formal educational requirements to become a bookkeeper, but one must be knowledgeable about financial topics and terms and strive for accuracy. Generally, a bookkeeper’s work is overseen by an accountant or the small business owner. A bookkeeper, though, is not an accountant, nor should they be considered to be an accountant.

Key takeaway: Bookkeepers can record financial transactions, post debits and credits, create invoices, manage payroll, and maintain and balance the books.

Startup Costs Every Business Should Know About

Because every business is different, your exact startup costs will depend on your business’s needs and specifications situs judi online. For example, a brick-and-mortar store will likely have higher startup costs than an online business, and a coffee shop requires different equipment and furniture than a bookstore.

However, some types of startup costs apply to most types of businesses.

Research costs
Though this is optional, some business owners hire market research firms to help them assess the industry and market before starting their business. You can save money by doing this step on your own, but if you hire a research firm, include this cost in your business plan. [Read related article: How to Conduct a Market Analysis for Your Business]

Borrowing costs
Creating any new business requires a lot of capital, which is usually acquired in one of two ways: equity financing or debt financing. Debt financing means borrowing money directly, whereas equity financing means selling a stake in your company to receive financial backing. Most businesses take out small business loans – including SBA loans – from banks or other lenders.

If you take out a loan, calculate the costs of the loan payments into your budget, and ensure payments are made on time.

Insurance, licensing and permit fees
As you write your business plan, research the licenses, permits or insurance required of your business. You should carry some form of insurance to cover yourself, your employees, and your business assets from any liabilities that may arise, and be sure you consider the continuing cost of renewing licenses or permits as needed. [Read related article: An Insurance Primer for Small Businesses]

Technology costs
This is an umbrella category that covers anything from the cost of creating and maintaining a website, setting up information systems, computers, and the use of accounting software and a payroll service.

Some small businesses may outsource their payroll and accounting needs to save money, though there are many budget-friendly options available. There are also plenty of ways to save on other technology costs, such as building your website.

“The cost of building out a website with customized graphics ran me about $1,200,” said Jonathan Mandell, CEO of Teepee. “I primarily used contractors on Upwork and Fiverr.”